Author Topic: Star Citizen - The E.L.E.  (Read 741578 times)

dsmart

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Re: Star Citizen - The E.L.E.
« Reply #1740 on: December 19, 2017, 04:10:29 PM »
Still 34 to 40k every day. Still fake I'd say.

I still think it's the subs. There is no other explanation for it to be so consistent on a daily/regular basis.

Star Citizen isn't a game. It's a TV show about a bunch of characters making a game. It's basically "This is Spinal Tap" - except people think the band is real.

helimoth

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Re: Star Citizen - The E.L.E.
« Reply #1741 on: December 19, 2017, 05:51:35 PM »
Funding tracker is easy to explain imo; if employees receive a funding pledge on their behalf as part of their monhtly remuneration or so then that can be added to the tracker so it would always look like a steady stream of spending.

dsmart

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Re: Star Citizen - The E.L.E.
« Reply #1742 on: December 19, 2017, 05:53:42 PM »
Funding tracker is easy to explain imo; if employees receive a funding pledge on their behalf as part of their monhtly remuneration or so then that can be added to the tracker so it would always look like a steady stream of spending.

 :lol:
Star Citizen isn't a game. It's a TV show about a bunch of characters making a game. It's basically "This is Spinal Tap" - except people think the band is real.

justme

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Re: Star Citizen - The E.L.E.
« Reply #1743 on: December 20, 2017, 05:48:43 AM »
there are some backers out there, double check the pledges.
i did that with some guys, too.

we also waited for a time with no pledges and did some on our own,
also created new accounts within this time. and everything always seems
to be working as intended, but...

it doesn't matter what you buy. this is just the total sum. so every merch,
every done subscription and every special is counted in, too.

but the biggest concern we had, is the raising funding in relation to the
raising citizens. and here we found out, that during no special time, about
20-25% of the new citizens only could pledge for a game package. the other
accounts are placeholders.
and this means, that the total plus of the sum is divided by the new citizens,
so we decided, that in this time no former backer bought anything. so the 20-25%
will be much lower.

and another thing is, that the guys with ref-codes out there, have several citizens
in their list, used that code. but also there are just 20-25% of the ref-code-users,
buying a game package, to count for your referal program.


during special events, like sales, concept sales, fairs and so on, this changes a lot,
but as we know, many former backers will buy the most, so we didn't tried to fit it in.



and that brings up the next imporant question.
as i wrote it in another topic, i was a customer of star wars the old republic. this game had
about 2mil players, plus some f2p users. in 2017 this was reduced to less than 1mil. and the
servers got empty, because all the players are seperated by time zones and different servers.
we calculated, that if the game servers, relating to old days, would be reduced to 3, there wouldn't
be even 1 full server, but you would have a better server population. during this time, there
were about 1.4mil subscribers.
(during this time, you could find the actual sum of sw:tor subscriptions in the ea-report)

now just imagine, that we have 2mil citizens. let us be optimistic and say, that 50% of them are
active players of the project. this only makes up 1mil players around the world. this would say,
that we would have about 500-1000 players around the world at the same time, depending on
the time you login.
i don't really now, how many systems are planned, how many planets, moons, whatever. but what
i could say, that the chance to meet another player ingame is really low.

some say, that thousands of players would come frome ED or EVE to join the game, if it is finished.
but that really doesn't matters. i can't imagine, that we will have something about 4mil active players,
with release. and even 4mil players would just be 2000-4000 players at the same time. and in a game
with these scales, this is not much.

that is why, they said the stuff with about 90% NPC around the verse. but even with that,
40,000 interactable characters, divided by 100 systems with at least 20 seperated locations,
will give you 20 characters in one location, 90% of them npc, so just 2 players. wow.



« Last Edit: December 20, 2017, 05:54:38 AM by justme »

dsmart

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Re: Star Citizen - The E.L.E.
« Reply #1744 on: December 20, 2017, 08:50:26 AM »
Yeah well we knew it was all a lie anyway; so we didn't pay any attention to all that nonsense they were saying.
Star Citizen isn't a game. It's a TV show about a bunch of characters making a game. It's basically "This is Spinal Tap" - except people think the band is real.

Flashwit

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Re: Star Citizen - The E.L.E.
« Reply #1745 on: December 20, 2017, 09:48:22 AM »
Also, the idea of people leaving EVE for SC is laughable. It's really a different kind of player, especially because EVE is so entrenched.

Motto

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Re: Star Citizen - The E.L.E.
« Reply #1746 on: December 20, 2017, 01:38:11 PM »
Even the fanbois are having serious doubts about the SQ42 trailer/teaser. Cultists are defending it with "it's just the trailer, wait until the actual footage. Man, if the trailer is this bad, what do you expect to see tomorrow? A full 4K movie on IMAX?
« Last Edit: December 20, 2017, 01:51:23 PM by Motto »

StanTheMan

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Re: Star Citizen - The E.L.E.
« Reply #1747 on: December 21, 2017, 04:52:59 AM »
Even the fanbois are having serious doubts about the SQ42 trailer/teaser. Cultists are defending it with "it's just the trailer, wait until the actual footage. Man, if the trailer is this bad, what do you expect to see tomorrow? A full 4K movie on IMAX?

Where do we watch the show ?

dsmart

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Star Citizen isn't a game. It's a TV show about a bunch of characters making a game. It's basically "This is Spinal Tap" - except people think the band is real.

Spunky Munkee

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Re: Star Citizen - The E.L.E.
« Reply #1749 on: December 21, 2017, 05:38:09 AM »
The whole 1:59 of fidelity packed awesomeness awaits you at

Personally, I got a lot more satisfaction out of this than I ever did from anything Chris Roberts made. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EeF3UTk

CODIW played perfectly, the ship physics were the same as the game is now in 3.0, the FPS is far superior (it actually works and is fun) and the story was good.

If Infinity Ward can crank out games that look this good where does CIG think this supposed huge sales of Squadron 42 are going to come from?

helimoth

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Re: Star Citizen - The E.L.E.
« Reply #1750 on: December 21, 2017, 08:13:09 AM »

If Infinity Ward can crank out games that look this good where does CIG think this supposed huge sales of Squadron 42 are going to come from?

Distributing the game itself must be a reasonable concern. Most developers/publishers are happy to give steam a nice chunk of the profits for dealing with the distribution aspect (on top of the marketing of their games that steam does) so it must be something which is worth paying others to deal with. If CIG can't even manage to current loads well of a few people beta testing the game on top of their own downloads what on earth will they do if they get thousands of people trying to concurrently download S42 on release day? Let's bare in mind most of the people who will be downloading it already have paid for it so it's not like there will be a load of fresh money to pay for servers to handle the initial deluge.

StanTheMan

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Re: Star Citizen - The E.L.E.
« Reply #1751 on: December 21, 2017, 01:44:41 PM »
Quote
if they get thousands of people trying to concurrently download S42 on release day?

It would be a nice problem to have...

Spunky Munkee

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Re: Star Citizen - The E.L.E.
« Reply #1752 on: December 21, 2017, 03:39:41 PM »
I'm sure that thousands have prepaid for it. I just doubt that it could sell another 50-100,000 copies at 40-60 dollars (or whatever the increased final price will be). I was thinking more along the fact that both had spaceship fighting, COD had FPS as its primary activity. There are choices and dialog in both games. One was developed and sold and made a safe profit and the other one pre sold and we have not seen more than 2 minutes of the current "updated" version as the original version looks very outdated.

While I enjoyed other COD titles more but I felt it was a good game, not outstanding but good. Titanfall 2 was a blast and worthy of a second and third playthrough at successively higher levels.

Marketing aside Roberts has already spent more time and money than COD IW and produced very little. I heard COD has 3 year development cycles but then again they are dealing with similar games every time, just new "tech" or scenarios for the player. Then again Roberts has made space games 2 decades ago, nothing new here other than the level of FIDELITY that others have had no problems with.

Just waiting for the other shoe to drop in this lawsuit. I want to see what crap CIG will put in their answer.

dsmart

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Re: Star Citizen - The E.L.E.
« Reply #1753 on: January 29, 2018, 02:42:53 PM »
Go ahead, tell me again how you don't think that Star Citizen funding chart is pure bullshit.




Star Citizen isn't a game. It's a TV show about a bunch of characters making a game. It's basically "This is Spinal Tap" - except people think the band is real.

dsmart

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Re: Star Citizen - The E.L.E.
« Reply #1754 on: February 02, 2018, 11:40:26 AM »
Gorf has another effort post up



It’s been a while since I’ve done this, but as a courtesy to our newer posters and lurkers, I wanted to offer one admittedly subjective summary of the present malaise, particularly with respect to the Star Citizen brand and Chris Roberts reputation as chief architect and spokesman.

(As a disclosure for those unaware, I don’t root for the failure of the project, even if I root for the failure of a select few. I genuinely believe there are hundreds of people working on the project doing their level best to deliver even though goalposts are forever shifting and many dysfunctional processes are both set in stone and protected by the lunatic leadership. That I am pessimistic about the future is not meant as blanket condemnation of the lot; it arises as grim acknowledgement of how densely concentrated organizational power is into the hands of the very worst of its members.)

STATE OF THE GAME - Q1 2018

Despite the claims of the funding tracker, I think parties at the very top of CIG see themselves looking at the downward revenue slope of a saturated market. A couple of years ago, and before many joking embellishments followed, I put up the old bell curve model:



No real inputs — I just grabbed a traditional bell curve off google images and made a guess where things were in late 2015. It was a little premature because I think the blowoff actually hit in 2016...

2016 - THE YEAR CHRIS LOST THE PLOT 

The fictive miracles of Gamescom / CitizenCon that year probably gave them the last truly meaningful boosts to organic new demand and deferential hype amplification from the gaming press, even as Roberts himself planted seeds of his own credibility destruction during that same critical period.

How interesting that the Streetroller refund controversy (July 2016) broke a month before Gamescom and “Inside the Troubled Development of Star Citizen” (September 23rd, 2016) broke right after. If nothing else, that series sent signals far and wide to others in the gaming press that this project about which there had already been much hype and controversy was at the very least struggling, perhaps mightily, under Chris’s chaotic leadership. Kotaku UK’s inclusion of the Level story translation framed the controversial elements (Derek Smart, Beer, “goons”, War) pretty fairly as well, and sent signals via new sourcing that perhaps some of the smoke coming up from The Escapist had some fire under it after all.

The net impact of that exhaustive series — coming as it did between two gollywhopper megahyper CIG events — was a very loud signal to the more serious writers at the more serious publications that perhaps the era of fawning deferential coverage of this Hype Train needed to slow because perhaps there were serious organizational/developmental/ethical problems still challenging it.

One can see the impact of this starting in 2017. Coverage didn’t stop, but it certainly slowed. A new caution and sometime snarkiness started creeping in to the coverage . Kotaku UK made it much safer to call Chris’s project “troubled” and “mired in controversy” and all the other qualifiers so common to stories nowadays. Even Charlie Hall does it, though usually as buried lede.

Yet the greatest blows to CIG during that incredibly consequential period of both hype and controversy were new self-inflicted wounds inflicted by the master himself.

Chris Roberts, with the note perfect timing of a Savant Self-Owner, helped confirm the “Troubled Development” narrative of Kotaku UK’s coverage at CitizenCon 2016, when the long-awaited, much-hyped Squadron 42 demo was a last minute no show after months of build up. Instead we got a ginormous Sandworm as the biggest, baddest symbol for hope yet. It was as fictive as phallic yet for some neither were enough to compensate for the MIA Squadron 42.

The Road to CitizenCon was quickly released as a palliative for the faithful, yet a deeper reading of the work shows only too clearly how damning it is of the development itself. In fact, it is one of the most inadvertent self-incriminating pieces of self-congratulatory agitprop since Sandi Gardiner’s disastrous Sunny’s Diner appearance years prior.

The purposefully manipulative “documentary” showed key developers losing sleep, highly stressed and enduring up to two months of constant crunch to deliver two demonstrations for CitizenCon. The Squadron 42 demo was meant to update fans on the actual progress of the two years late game yet could not be completed in time. The “Homestead” demo was crafted expressly as a fiction starring a fake sandworm, fake enemy NPCs and fake combat, was CitizenCon’s redeeming ‘triumph.’ How perfectly appropriate.

—A BRIEF :tinfoil: TANGENT

(This will read as bridge too far for some, yet I have trouble shaking the sense there’s truth to it.)

I am cynical enough now about Roberts vanity to believe that the Squadron demo never really stood a chance and that Chris and a trusted few knew long in advance he would not show it at CitizenCon.

Yes, that’s pure :tinfoil:, and I’d never fight to defend it, yet the circumstantial case is quite suggestive and it’s hardly unlike Roberts to craft fictions with cynical intent. That is in fact one of his only proven talents and has been key to their stratospheric fundraising (yet at this point of waning appetite for the game even that fundraising itself appears partly a work of manipulation.)

So it’s very worth asking ourselves, ”why would CIG be filming a mini-documentary weeks in advance of CitizenCon 2016, one so maudlin, manipulative and expressly framed as a ‘it’s for the best’ so ’sorry not sorry’ about a demo they fully expected they would show up until two days before the event?”

It makes no sense to christen so dramatic a production so far in advance absent foreknowledge that you were going to need it. And indeed they did need it, as the CitCon 2016 rage was real for many until the opiate of “The Road to CitizenCon” was administered and all way forgiven.

It is more plausible to me that Roberts decided well in advance that Squadron would not be previewed at CitCon because he genuinely feared further humiliating comparisons with Infinite Warfare. It’s Wing Commanderish campaign was as slick, bombastic and cinematic as you’d expect from a AAA powerhouse, the motion capture was often near photoreal, and the prospects of either the media itself or “the anonymous hate campaign” juxtaposing clips from his Squadron demo for a game he himself once described as “the equivalent of huge AAA Call of Duty but better” legitimately worried him. Even the Fanboys had taken to reddit that summer to praise what they’d seen at E3 and chide CIG using Infinite Warfare as rebuke.

Roberts was fortunate that COD futurism fatigue and a bumbled multiplayer launch kept Infinite Warfare from being a franchise triumph, but the single player campaign itself deserved the ample praise for its ‘World War 2 story in space’ received and oops, Infinite Warfare even delivered the emotional payoff Roberts thought was only his to deliver.

(BTW- if his RTV claim about touching emotional territory rarely reached with video games was not Roberts telegraphing the self-sacrifing death of ‘Old Man’ at the end of Squadron 42, I’d be amazed. You have to wonder if that’s what Lando is referring to here. It’s the easiest, most obvious possible way to emotionally manipulate the Wing Commander nostalgiacs, so I’m calling that big mashing of the FEELS button here now.)

—END OF :tinfoil:

The absence of a Squadron slice denied the media and his mockers a chance to put his “Call of Duty but better” claims to the Trial by Memes Roberts rightly feared. The ‘presciently’ sanctioned documentary about its absence turned the legitimate anger about the no show demo back onto the victims, provoking yet more guilt they shouldn’t feel for Roberts’ sins. HE was the one crunching devs on show demos. HE was the one demanding that ‘not a joke’ sandworms be grabbed from the sci-fi trope box and inserted into his fundraising fictions. HE was the one selling things not in the game.

With refund dramas and “troubled development” narratives competing directly against Roberts increasingly tiresome flyboy swagger at Gamescom and CitizenCon, it was Roberts who proposed the final test to determine whether a deluded bug mouth or a brilliant visionary helmed the enterprise.

Could he or could he not deliver the whole of Stanton by year end? 4 planets, 12 moons and a handful of new mechanics that could finally give long-suffering backers renewed faith in his competence, his genius, or trustworthiness?

He said he thought they could, even though he’d never bothered consulting his Devs on that possibility and indeed, many were horrified to see him once again throw a gauntlet down they’d never be able to lift. Yet would this time be different?  Was he just a guy with chronic mismanager with a runaway mouth running a Troubled Development, or might Chris actually deliver this time?

No, he could not.

No more than he could deliver Squadron 42 at the end of 2015 as he’d said they do. No more than he could deliver Star Marine in “3 weeks time” as he said that same day he’d do.

As with nearly all things but disappointment, Chris Roberts delivered much less, much later, and in the case of 3.0, even upon delivery, he delivered mediocrity at a fraction of the originally promised scale.

Let us remember, too, that Chris had justified the long wait of his all important 3.0 patch because it needed extra polish and bugfixing. It needed to be friendlier than any patch prior because so many new users would be signing up. Yet a year and a half after it dazzled the crowds of the faithful, it finally arrived in the classic tradition backers had miserably come to expect — broken, empty, lifeless and stuttering.

With 3.0, Roberts failed the test he himself inadvertently proposed.

In so doing, he confirmed for all but the most devoted faithful that his critics were right. The dichotomy that prompted so much uncertainty and debate in 2016 was over. It was not the cynics who bested Roberts, it was Roberts, and he did it as the cynics expected he would, by being himself.

2017 - THE YEAR OF LIVING DISSAPOINTINGLY

If 2016 was the zenith of years of cumulating hype and expectation, 2017 was the year of diminishing expectations and growing outrages. Until the “miraculous” turnaround of the anniversary sale you could see it in their own reported numbers. You could read it in the growing number of full combat comment fields under any Star Citizen news story. New voices of skepticism on the Star Citizen subreddit were sometimes catapulted to the top of the charts not with memes or praises but with criticisms, warnings, frustrations. The widely read /Games subreddit saw skepticism about the project flourishing amongst the mainstream gamer population.

In 2017, CIG’s  efforts to bolster the faithful at the usual venues only compounded the damage further.

Gamescom 2017 delivered cringe so real it hurt, reinforcing further still the “Troubled Narrative” claims and sending the “Chris Roberts, Savior of PC Gaming” myths up in glorious self-parody.

CitizenCon 2017 delivered this year’s model Sandworm, a planet covered in buildings melding the newly released Blade Runner with the prequel’s Coruscant signifying little beyond “Chris Roberts Fever dream hype demo, 2017 edition. Was it cool to watch? Sure. Was it coming soon to the game? Not a chance, and even the Believers know that. It was simply the latest in a long line of golden calves Roberts erected before the people that they might worship false divinity as he lead them once again in circles through his wilderness. That some will still do it though they know the calf wrought of their own melted wealth speaks more to their desperation than true faithfulness. Yet what other choice has Roberts left then?

2018: CAPITULATION TO THE OBVIOUS FOR ALL BUT THE OBLIVIOUS

Though the year-end numbers managed to mask it, 2017 was the year Chris Roberts faced down his mortal enemy — himself — and lost.

Those looking ahead in 2018 for truer hopes to cling to than bygone show buzz and the 100th rewatch of the Imagine video will find an emptier horizon line than in prior years.

That we’ll see no Squadron release in 2018 is obvious already. Chris Roberts is unlikely to explicitly state the infuriating obvious and instead will just show clips and progress on a monthly basis like the carrot on a stick it has been since 2012.

The decision not to attend Gamescom this year is itself a telling sign, yet lest we risk missing it, CIG explicitly stated their reasoning; they don’t want their developers distracted with all the preparation work such an event demands of them. That this concern never stopped them before and was glorified in “The Road to CitizenCon” suggests a deeper reading, and that reading is capitulation.

What good might such an event be when they’ve saturated the market and hype fatigue plagues even the faithful? When the very game itself has become so unplayable that marketing it courts frustration and mockery? There is too little to be gained this year in so exhausted a marketplace with so damaged a brand, so tired a narrative, so broken a game.

So with Squadron and Gamescom off the calendar, 3.1 aiming for performance improvements only (if they can get them) and the features of this summer’s 3.2 so uncertain that Community Manager Disco Lando scoffs at community attempts to nail them down, what else might we expect this year?

SPECULATIVE: Player housing for sale

Cash purchasable player structures may be a high priority now, though Chris has said nothing recently to explicitly affirm that. Land claims were the thin end of that wedge and Lando’s very first question on the very first episode of Calling All Devs was about Land Claims.

How curious that something which earned them bad PR and a fan backlash goes to the front of the question line. Stranger still that Dave Haddock was the one being asked as he will have absolutely nothing to do with its implementation. The cynical reading would be that Land Claims (and later structure sales) are a Chris Roberts priority being fast-tracked out of LA at his insistence for financial reasons. Roberts himself went into his rationale for Land Claims and pitched it as the protection racket it so clearly was designed to be. Land claims bore all the hallmarks of a new feature made urgent priority not because the game needed it so much as because Roberts wants new revenue lines ASAP.

Since he employees a gigantic army of modelers and artists it would not be surprising if a subset is already working up models for shacks, hideouts, condos, bases, rest stops, whatever... I’d also not be surprised if he’s bent Garriott’s ear for tips but even if not there is a lot that can be gleaned just from playing SOTA and exploring their cash shop. Where Garriott sells castles, Roberts would sell space mansions, and the rationale would be “you don’t really want to park your 890 Jump at just a sad little outpost, do you? Poorly matched AND unprotected? Well have I got a deal for you!”

SPECULATIVE: For Sale By Owner, a piece of the Dream Factory itself?

Similarly, it wouldn’t be surprising if Garriott’s seedinvest experiment hasn’t been studied for replication by Roberts as funding sources decline. It wasn’t a barn burner but they hit their minimum target, and Roberts being Roberts, he’s probably doing napkin calculations already to map out worst and best case yields.

These aren’t explicit predictions so much as cynical hunches, and the cynicism is rooted in seeing last year defy worst case scenarios. There are obviously some big fires they need to put out too this year, not the least of which is basic playability.

As much as it probably hurts Chris to put player needs ahead of his own wants for a change, until they fix their networking / performance issues, they’re pretty much in a tar pit unable to get back to the good work Chris prefers; selling things, redesigning things, polishing things. It remains to be seen if and to what extent they can clear those obstacles.

Even assuming they clear the Stability / Performance hurdle, a hurdle they’ve given little confidence they can overcome, the next hurdle before them remains no less vexing — can they start to design a game worth playing? Roberts himself is no ally to such an endeavor; indeed, he has proven only too clearly how much it disinterested him, for during the six years he could spent designing and refining The Best Damn Space Sim Ever, he instead was focused on an entirely different game and still it consumes him. Selling an unbelievable future at an unjustifiable price to anyone still foolish enough to trust the industry’s biggest underdeliverer will somehow deliver it.
Star Citizen isn't a game. It's a TV show about a bunch of characters making a game. It's basically "This is Spinal Tap" - except people think the band is real.

 

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